Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://cris.library.msu.ac.zw//handle/11408/1860
Title: Media construction of reality : a critical analysis of the reportage of land reform in Shona and English Zimbabwean newspapers : the case of Kwayedza, The Herald, The Daily News and The Daily Mirror, 2000-2008
Authors: Mushore, Washington
Keywords: Framing, land, reform, Shona, English, Newspapers
Kwayedza, The Herald, The Daily News, The Daily Mirror, Zimbabwe
Issue Date: 2012
Publisher: Unisa
Abstract: The study critically explored the language of reportage of the Zimbabwe Land Reform programme as presented in selected Shona and English newspapers in Zimbabwe. The study focused on Kwayedza, The Herald, The Daily News and The Daily Mirror. The objective was to find out whether or not the verbal and visual languages used in reporting the Land Reform programme left readers more knowledgeable about the programme, and then adopt a critical attitude towards the Land Reform exercise. The study used qualitative textual analysis to unpack the language frames used in representing Land Reform in the selected newspapers. Some relevant critical voices from readers were also enlisted in order to support or complicate interpretations of how Land Reform was portrayed in the selected stories. Kwayedza and The Herald unequivocally supported the Land Reform. This official stance was contested in Chapter Four in which The Daily News adopted an ideological position opposed to both the idea of the Land Reform and the confiscatory way the land was repossessed. The Daily News’ extremely negative criticism of the Land Reform was challenged and then modified in The Daily Mirror. The Daily Mirror criticised both the government’s extremely supportive view of the Land Reform. The Daily Mirror also openly criticised The Daily News for refusing to acknowledge the historical inevitability and necessity of the Land Reform. The Daily Mirror advanced a perspective that suggested that Land Reform programme should benefit the masses more than the elites. It was argued that in contexts of political change such as that of Zimbabwe, newspapers take a stance and support particular ideological interests.
URI: http://uir.unisa.ac.za/handle/10500/10201
http://hdl.handle.net/11408/1860
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