Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://cris.library.msu.ac.zw//handle/11408/6099
Title: Assessing plant utilisation by communities bordering a protected area in Zimbabwe using utilitarian diversity metrics
Authors: G. M. Dowo
S. Kativu
M. De Garine-Witchatitsky
Department of Biological Sciences and Ecology, University of Zimbabwe, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe; Department of Applied Biosciences and Biotechnology, Midlands State University, Gweru, Zimbabwe; Research Platform - Production and Conservation in Partnership (RP-PCP), Harare, Zimbabwe
Department of Biological Sciences and Ecology, University of Zimbabwe, Mount Pleasant, Harare, Zimbabwe; Research Platform - Production and Conservation in Partnership (RP-PCP), Harare, Zimbabwe
Research Platform - Production and Conservation in Partnership (RP-PCP), Harare, Zimbabwe; CIRAD, GREASE, Faculty Veterinary Medicine, Kasetsart University, Bangkok, Thailand
Keywords: Gonarezhou
alpha diversity
utilitarian diversity
protected areas
ecosystem services
Issue Date: 22-Mar-2024
Publisher: Taylor and Francis Group
UNISA Press
Abstract: Protected areas and their peripheries harbour biodiverse ecosystems which underpin ecosystem service provision to local communities. Understanding the relationship between the species contained within these ecosystems and the utilitarian services they provide is important. However, there is a shortage of quantitative methods for assessing species’ utilitarian roles. We used a dendrogram-based method to quantify utilitarian diversity and an ordination method to determine co-occurrences in three sites at the periphery of Gonarezhou National Park, in Zimbabwe. The use categories for the plants were determined using household questionnaire surveys, and vegetation data was collected via standard plotless sampling techniques. There was higher plant diversity in the sites adjacent to the protected area, i.e. Malipati communal area (S = 45; Simpson’s index = 0.7271) and Gonakudzingwa farms (S = 50; Simpson’s index = 0.9351), with the lowest diversity recorded at the site far from the park, i.e. Chomupani communal area (S = 25; Simpson’s index = 0.6305). Utilitarian diversity was also highest in the areas adjacent to the protected area, with Malipati and Gonakudzingwa having values of 22.2 and 21.4, respectively, while Chomupani attained 20.6. A principal component analysis ordination indicated which utilitarian species occurred in the same areas. Our results contribute to plant conservation by highlighting the utilitarian relationships of species at protected area peripheries. This allows planners and conservationists to set conservation priorities to avoid losing species that contribute the most to ecosystem service provision.
URI: https://cris.library.msu.ac.zw//handle/11408/6099
Appears in Collections:Research Papers

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