Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://cris.library.msu.ac.zw//handle/11408/6117
Title: Socio-spatial equity analysis of relative wealth index and emergency obstetric care accessibility in urban Nigeria
Authors: Kerry L. M. Wong
Aduragbemi Banke-Thomas
Tope Olubodun
Peter M. Macharia
Charlotte Stanton
Narayanan Sundararajan
Yash Shah
Gautam Prasad
Mansi Kansal
Swapnil Vispute
Tomer Shekel
Olakunmi Ogunyemi
Uchenna Gwacham-Anisiobi
Jia Wang
Ibukun-Oluwa Omolade Abejirinde,
Prestige Tatenda Makanga
Bosede B. Afolabi
Lenka Beňová
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK
Faculty of Epidemiology and Population Health, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; School of Human Sciences, University of Greenwich, London, UK; Maternal and Reproductive Health Research Collective, Lagos, Nigeria
Department of Community Medicine and Primary Care, Federal Medical Centre Abeokuta, Abeokuta, Ogun Nigeria
Department of Public Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium; Population & Health Impact Surveillance Group, Kenya Medical Research Institute-Wellcome Trust Research Programme, Nairobi, Kenya; Centre for Health Informatics, Computing, and Statistics, Lancaster Medical School, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Google LLC, Mountain View, CA USA
Lagos State Ministry of Health, Ikeja, Lagos Nigeria
Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK
School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences, University of Greenwich, London, UK
Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; Women’s College Hospital Institute for Health System Solutions and Virtual Care, Toronto, Canada
Surveying and Geomatics Department, Midlands State University Faculty of Science and Technology, Gweru, Midlands Zimbabwe; Climate and Health Division, Centre for Sexual Health and HIV/AIDS Research, Harare, Zimbabwe
Maternal and Reproductive Health Research Collective, Lagos, Nigeria; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, College of Medicine of the University of Lagos, Lagos, Nigeria
Department of Public Health, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium
Keywords: relative wealth index
emergency obstetric care
accessibility
Nigeria
Issue Date: 28-Feb-2024
Publisher: Nature Research
Abstract: Background Better geographical accessibility to comprehensive emergency obstetric care (CEmOC) facilities can significantly improve pregnancy outcomes. However, with other factors, such as affordability critical for care access, it is important to explore accessibility across groups. We assessed CEmOC geographical accessibility by wealth status in the 15 most-populated Nigerian cities. Methods We mapped city boundaries, verified and geocoded functional CEmOC facilities, and assembled population distribution for women of childbearing age and Meta’s Relative Wealth Index (RWI). We used the Google Maps Platform’s internal Directions Application Programming Interface to obtain driving times to public and private facilities. City-level median travel time (MTT) and number of CEmOC facilities reachable within 60 min were summarised for peak and non-peak hours per wealth quintile. The correlation between RWI and MTT to the nearest public CEmOC was calculated. Results We show that MTT to the nearest public CEmOC facility is lowest in the wealthiest 20% in all cities, with the largest difference in MTT between the wealthiest 20% and least wealthy 20% seen in Onitsha (26 vs 81 min) and the smallest in Warri (20 vs 30 min). Similarly, the average number of public CEmOC facilities reachable within 60 min varies (11 among the wealthiest 20% and six among the least wealthy in Kano). In five cities, zero facilities are reachable under 60 min for the least wealthy 20%. Those who live in the suburbs particularly have poor accessibility to CEmOC facilities. Conclusions Our findings show that the least wealthy mostly have poor accessibility to care. Interventions addressing CEmOC geographical accessibility targeting poor people are needed to address inequities in urban settings
URI: https://cris.library.msu.ac.zw//handle/11408/6117
Appears in Collections:Research Papers

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